FYI

Dentist blog from Delta Dental

Are you on your patient’s wavelength?

Each patient visit is an opportunity to build trust in your care. Being culturally aware enables you to communicate clearly and understandably with patients, no matter their ethnic or cultural backgrounds. One-to-one communication with patients at their levels shows respect and can increase cooperation in their treatment.

Why is this more important now? Your current (and potential) patients’ cultural backgrounds and ethnicities reflect America’s growing diversity. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s July 2019 estimates, this is the makeup of the U.S. population:

  • White (not Hispanic or Latino): 60.1%
  • Hispanic or Latino: 18.5%
  • Black or African American 13.4%
  • Asian: 5.9%
  • American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander: 1.5%

Since the 2010 U.S. Census, the non-white population percentage has increased from 36.2 to 39.9. Being aware of cultural differences, especially language, will put you and your patients on the same wavelength for achieving quality care. And you can develop valuable skills to do this.

Cultural competency consists of five components:

  1. Cultural awareness. Take time to understand patients’ beliefs, values and practices.
  2. Cultural knowledge. Learn world views of diverse patient groups.
  3. Cultural skill. Collect relevant cultural data about the patients’ health problems and conduct interviews and evaluations to determine treatments based on needs.
  4. Cultural encounters. Participate in multicultural activities to learn about diverse groups.
  5. Cultural desire. Deliver care for all patients equally, regardless of cultural values and beliefs.

To raise your practice’s competency level, you can take steps to more effectively communicate with patients of diverse backgrounds and their friends and relatives.

3 steps for closing the language gap

Ask your patients (or their friends or family members) what their preferred language is and what makes them comfortable and note it in the chart. Communicating with a patient in his or her native language is key.  Not only does this put patients more at ease, but it also makes it easier to track their concerns about care.

Besides English, the top languages spoken at home in the U.S. are (ranked in order by most speakers):  Spanish, Chinese, French and French Creole, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean, German, Arabic, Russian and Italian.

But what if you don’t speak your patients’ native languages? You can take three steps to boost your practice’s language capabilities:

  1. Take advantage of Delta Dental’s Language Assistance Program. Customer Service phone assistance is available in over 170 languages for enrollees.
  2. Advise patients with limited English proficiency that they can call the LAP to arrange for a qualified interpreter to help at no cost. For onsite interpretation services, call at least 72 hours in advanced of the appointment time.
  3. Keep on hand printed materials translated in the languages most relevant to your practice so they’re available to patients. This may include forms, pre- and post-operative instructions, health and wellness materials, emergency phone numbers and anything else that may help.

How to boost your practice’s cultural awareness

Learning more about cultural differences and achieving competency are two ways to ensure that your practice thrives in a changing cultural landscape.  You can do this by gaining skills:

  • Attend classes and continuing education courses, onsite or online, that address social customs among different cultures in your community.
  • Go to multicultural events to learn about the interests, lifestyles and values of people with diverse backgrounds and form relationships.
  • Learn a few key phrases in native languages, such as “hello,” “please,” “thank you,” “open wide,” “where does it hurt?” and “do you have any questions?”
  • If you have bilingual or multilingual staff members, encourage them to help co-workers communicate with patients.

Achieving cultural competency can help your practice welcome more patients. You can update your Delta Dental directory listing if you have fluency in non-English languages. Let patients know you are on their wavelength

Delta Dental language resources for your practice

  • Our website in English and in Spanish
  • Automated telephone service for eligibility, benefits and more in Spanish
  • Downloadable English to Spanish phrase guide (PDF)
  • Dentist Handbook: Log in and select Reference Library; you can find LAP resource information and English, Chinese and Spanish versions of enrollee grievance forms.

DentaQual ratings update

This spring, DentaQual ratings were added to dentist directory listings. The program introduction was positively received and we are sharing a national announcement to broaden the understanding of the system as it is rolled out to more listings. In preparation for these changes, you can learn more about how DentaQual works, how it can help your practice and how ratings are developed.

Kids’ unmet oral health needs highlighted by the pandemic

Do you know how many of your patients plan to become pregnant or adopt a child in the next year? Unlike physicians, you probably see most of your patients every six months. In the space between cleanings, a woman could be almost 2/3 of the way through a pregnancy or an average adoption could be nearly finalized.

Since visits can be far apart, communication is key. When your patients tell you about plans to have a child, tell them how important it is to consider dental health and visits to the dentist as an important part of a child’s overall health. Less than half of parents receive professional advice on when to start taking their child to the dentist, which can lead to early oral health problems and dental disease.

The pandemic’s effect on pediatric oral health

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, dental disease among children was rampant:

The pandemic made these problems worse by stressing the financial systems that deliver dental care with job loss that led to lack of coverage and loss in income. As a result of the pandemic, households were three times more likely to indicate that dental care was an unmet health need of theirs rather than medical care, according to a JADA study. The authors found a significant association between the probability of unmet child dental care and pandemic-related household income or job loss.

About 40% of families reported the loss of a job or decrease in income due to the pandemic. Before the pandemic, children from families with lower incomes or on Medicaid were twice as likely to have cavities than children from higher-income households. Whether due to lost or decreased income, fear of contracting COVID-19 or mixed communication from health organizations, dental care visits dropped in 2020.

Luckily, households were unlikely to completely lose health insurance during the pandemic. Robust signups for Medicare and Medicaid kept many people insured. But cost remains the major barrier to receiving dental care. Although access to pediatric dental care has grown for families with public insurance since the early 2000s, inequitable access continues to be linked to socioeconomic status. Additional barriers include difficulty finding a dentist, transportation and geographic proximity to available dentists.

What you can do to address unmet needs

As a dentist or a hygienist, you’ve got a lot to do in a day. You can still find ways to address children’s health that fit into your office’s workflow. Here are some examples you can use to start the conversation with your co-workers and with patients:

  • Talk about timelines. Be sure to inform any new parents, guardians or caretakers about recommended timelines for pediatric care to guarantee they get the information they need from a trusted source.
  • Get innovative. Did you know that 75% of pediatric dentists offer virtual services, compared to only a third of general dentists? If you haven’t explored teledentistry services, consider adding them to your repertoire.
  • Share materials. Explore Delta Dental’s wellness resources and share a selection of helpful articles and flyers in your office or on your website. You can even highlight assets that are made for kids, like MySmileKids and Grin! for Kids.
  • Collaborate instead of criticizing. Making a patient feel guilty, ashamed or afraid for their health rarely works to inspire improvement. Focus on behaviors that they can change and empower them with knowledge.
  • Gather information. Your patients may feel uncomfortable if you ask them directly about their plans to conceive or adopt in the next year. If your practice already does pre-screenings, consider adding a question to capture that information and add it to the patient’s file.

How Delta Dental invests in communities

The best way to treat the pediatric oral health dilemma is large investment in public dental health, something dentists can’t really do on their own. The COVID-19 pandemic stressed the financial system that supports the delivery of dental care services, revealing that changes are required to support access to dental care during times of changing financial situations.

To help dentists make investments in their communities, the Delta Dental Community Care Foundation awards several million dollars in grants each year to increase access to care. These awards enable underserved individuals, including children, to get preventive and restorative treatments in accessible locations. More than 250 organizations received funding from the Delta Dental Community Care Foundation during the COVID-19 pandemic, totaling $11 million to provide relief. Many of these clinics support and serve children.

These Access to Care grants fund activities designed to remove barriers to seeking care such as distance, cost and even fear. The grants can be used to set up mobile or pop-up clinics in a local community, provide dental care in underserved clinical settings, fund outreach programs or offset costs for clinics that routinely provide care to underserved populations.

What comes next

The U.S. economy seems to be recovering. The national unemployment rate is projected to fall to 5.3% by the end of the year. But the problems highlighted by the pandemic shouldn’t be ignored.

As a dentist or dental hygienist, you can’t be expected to fix all of the problems in the American economy or health care industry. Still, by making active efforts to be accessible and communicative with your patients, you can make a difference in their lives and the lives of their children.

Upcoming Provider Tools webinars in June

This June, dive deep into Provider Tools with webinars full of helpful productivity tips and commonly asked questions. Learn how to simplify and speed up your workflow with:

  • Online patient eligibility and benefits information
  • Real-time claim submission and claim status checks
  • Direct deposit sign-up and management

You’ll also learn more about Delta Dental – Virtual Consult, a new virtual dentistry tool that you can use for one-on-one video appointments with patients.

Get ready to be more productive and register for a webinar today:

Have a specific question about our tools? You can also schedule a 1:1 call.

5 easy steps for staying searchable in the directory

Millions of Delta Dental members rely on the Find a Dentist directory. Is your practice’s information searchable? More importantly, is it correct?

Your directory listing is key to helping patients find you. It only takes a few minutes to check on your office’s information and your patients will be glad you did. If you changed your hours during COVID-19 restrictions, hired a staff member who speaks a different language or made any other updates, consider revising your listing.

How to update your directory listing:

  1. Log into Provider Tools and select My account.
  2. Click on Directory profile.
  3. Go to Actions and click Open.
  4. Update information, as needed.
  5. Save as draft or select Publish.

That’s it! You’re on your way to ensuring healthy smiles for new and existing patients. While you’re at it, we recommend setting a yearly reminder to check on the accuracy of your listing. You might also want to update your information on heavily searched sites:

Yelp

Facebook

Google

Apple

Grow your practice with Virtual Consult

Is your practice ready to offer virtual dentistry to your patients? In 2019, the global teledentistry market stood at a little more than $667 million. Before the decade is over, the market is expected to reach $2.6 billion. You won’t want to miss out on that kind of growth.

But teledentistry isn’t just a great business opportunity. It’s also great for patients. As Dr. Deirmenjian, the CEO of Smiles West Dental Management says, “We firmly believe that teledentistry will continue to be the future of building healthier smiles.”

Setting up a teledentistry space in your office may sound expensive and daunting if you don’t already have the necessary equipment and a speedy internet connection. Fortunately, there’s a tool that makes teledentistry simple: Delta Dental – Virtual Consult. If you haven’t signed up yet, it’s not too late!

Virtual Consult is the perfect tool to increase your access to patients and your earning potential. Virtual Consult lets you check in with and diagnose Delta Dental members remotely, all with an emphasis on simplicity when it comes to scheduling and claims. With Virtual Consult, you can:

  • Increase your patient volume and attract new patients
  • Save time and money
  • Set your own hours
  • Get detailed training and support
  • Automate communications with your patients

Interested? Just fill out the online form and we’ll reach out to you about getting started with Virtual Consult.

« Older posts

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑